about

Minnesota-related news from the Twin Cities Daily Planet, a nonprofit, online community news publication. We also have a Tumblr for our arts coverage.

tumblr menu

also find us on

Though Robocop isn’t patrolling Nicollet Mall (unfortunately) and Siri leaves something to be desired, there’s no question that our relationships with machines are becoming closer and closer—you’re reading this on a machine, and for some of you there may be machines beating in place of your heart or serving as your legs and feet. What better institution to sponsor a discussion of this brave new world than the Science Museum of Minnesota, and where better to have it than that most blessedly human of places—no, not a church, a bar. On June 12 at Amsterdam Bar & Hall, Kenneth Rys of Medtronic and sculptor Allen Christian (he of the anthropomorphic bowling balls) will talk (wo)man and machine.

Though Robocop isn’t patrolling Nicollet Mall (unfortunately) and Siri leaves something to be desired, there’s no question that our relationships with machines are becoming closer and closer—you’re reading this on a machine, and for some of you there may be machines beating in place of your heart or serving as your legs and feet. What better institution to sponsor a discussion of this brave new world than the Science Museum of Minnesota, and where better to have it than that most blessedly human of places—no, not a church, a bar. On June 12 at Amsterdam Bar & Hall, Kenneth Rys of Medtronic and sculptor Allen Christian (he of the anthropomorphic bowling balls) will talk (wo)man and machine.

0 notes | Permalink

Last summer, Ayub Ali, a seventh grade student at Al-Amal, a private Islamic school in Fridley, was talking to his father, who had been a soldier in his home country of Somalia. His father had been shot in his toe, and had to have it sawed off to get the bullet out, Ali said. Speaking with his father, Ali began thinking—what if human beings could regenerate body parts, similar to the way that planaria, a kind of flatworm, regenerates itself?

Last summer, Ayub Ali, a seventh grade student at Al-Amal, a private Islamic school in Fridley, was talking to his father, who had been a soldier in his home country of Somalia. His father had been shot in his toe, and had to have it sawed off to get the bullet out, Ali said. Speaking with his father, Ali began thinking—what if human beings could regenerate body parts, similar to the way that planaria, a kind of flatworm, regenerates itself?

1 note | Permalink